No more medical CDs? We hope.

Many seniors likely have experienced the frustration—and fear—having radiological tests results that needed to be read by multiple doctors. The tests, downloaded to CD, may be transferred through the mails or hand-carried by the patient, but at its best the process can add days, even a week, to diagnostic time. At its worst, when the […]

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Windows on a Watch–ulp!

We often argue that seniors know far more about computers than the popular media gives credit for, so we know that many of you are familiar with Windows 95, which was considered so revolutionary only twenty years ago that Microsoft was able to get The Rolling Stones to shill for it. Still, we experienced our own sense of […]

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Medicare tries to make its stars shine brighter

In an earlier post, we had mentioned that the New York Times exposed that many nursing homes have figured out how to game Medicare’s Five Star Quality Ratings System. CMS (the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) has just announced improvements to the ratings system, which will be implemented next year. They attempt to address many of […]

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New wallet makes using cards easier

ID cards, credit cards, loyalty cards, life seems to be filled with cards that need to be dug out of purses and wallets, which as fingers get older and joints get stiffer becomes increasingly painful. There’s currently a Kickstarter campaign to fund a new type of wallet that might make using all those cards easier. Designed […]

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Coming soon (but not soon enough!), pt.2: Fewer injections?

Continuing the theme of fewer needles = happier patients, MIT today described a possible way to deliver drugs in pill form that currently can only be injected. The problem, as the MIT press release describes, is that “many drugs, especially those made from large proteins, cannot be given as a pill because they get broken down in the […]

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Coming soon (but not soon enough!) near-painless blood draws

The only thing worse than having blood drawn is how much of it needs to be drawn. Just when you think you’ve reached your limit on needle sticks and bruising, a tech comes at you with yet another vial that needs to be filled. Entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes figured, as most of us do, there had […]

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A “smart” approach to budgeting?

For many seniors, retirement and/or unexpected medical expenses mean much stricter budgeting than ever before. The Cash Smartwatch promises to help you keep on track—we only hope it can save you enough to make up for its $140 price. Essentially, it’s a spreadsheet packed into a watch. You put in what you’re spending throughout the day […]

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FDA approves new treatment for diabetes-related vision loss

According to the American Diabetes Association, “Approximately 25% of Americans over the age of 60 years have diabetes, and aging of the U.S. population is widely acknowledged as one of the drivers of the diabetes epidemic.” One of the more frightening consequences of diabetes is diabetic macular edema (DME), which can lead to acute vision […]

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New website addresses medical conflict-of-interest

As many seniors often grumble, they see their doctors more than they see their children. If your doctor receives a payment from a drug or device company, whether lunch or full-funding of a research program, can she or he stay objective about that company’s offerings? The answer may ultimately lie with the ethics of the […]

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A nanotech approach to increasing the power of antibiotics

As we age, our immune systems degrade, so the increasing ineffectiveness of many antibiotics leaves seniors especially vulnerable. According to UCLA bioengineering professor Gerard Wong, “It takes upwards of $100 million to develop one antibiotic drug, and bacteria develop resistance to it within two years. It’s a race that we can’t win.” Fortunately, he and his […]

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